There is No Winter Break For Science

Even if you are not publishing, the best time for experiments often happens when electrical noise is less; ground vibrations are minimized; and fewer folks are near by to disturb the science.  Catching a bite at the Hospital Cafeteria – the only open and convenient  restaurant for turkey and cranberries during Thanksgiving Dinner is often rewarded with newly found friends 🙂

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“There’s No Winter Break From ‘Publish or Perish’”

An analysis of submissions to two top journals showed that scientists in the U.S. were highly likely to be working during holidays.

By

Dec. 18, 2019

 

“Jay Van Bavel, a social neuroscientist at New York University, is vowing not to work during the Christmas holidays.

“A few years ago, Dr. Van Bavel had agreed to conduct peer review on a couple of manuscripts before the end of the semester. But he got really busy and ended up having to do one on Christmas Day and another on New Year’s Eve, while his family was visiting.

“I felt like I let down myself and my family,” said Dr. Van Bavel, who gets asked to conduct peer-review 100 to 200 times a year. But he says he has now learned his lesson, and is not planning to do any work in the Christmas holidays this year, except perhaps the odd email.

“If Dr. Van Bavel holds to his vow, he’ll beat the trend of many of his colleagues. While you might be setting an out-of-office message and backing away from your keyboard as the winter holidays set in, many researchers in academia can be found working straight through the season. Scientists based in the United States are, in fact, the third most likely to work during holidays, behind only their counterparts in Belgium and Japan, according to a study published Thursday in BMJ….”


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