“Weakening of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex by Arctic Sea-Ice Loss”

The chief inspiration of my modeling of Arctic Sea-Ice extent and the effect of specific Arctic melt regions on North America Winters is this Communique, a collaboration of Battelle-PNNL science and international collaborators.  At the time I began this effort, I was just looking for the effects of the Sea-Ice minimum during the Winter.  I had not, at that time, tied in the global effect of temperature rise.  I had not yet assigned a “cause”, in others words.  It is clear now that the cause is Global Warming.


THIS IS THE SCIENCE – OR PART OF IT

If there is any doubt among ‘deniers’, the publication of a Nature Communication is a real test of both the veracity of the scientists and science.

Link to Full Article in Nature Communication 

2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

 

“Baek-Min Kim1, Seok-Woo Son2, Seung-Ki Min3, Jee-Hoon Jeong4, Seong-Joong Kim1, Xiangdong Zhang5, Taehyoun Shim4 & Jin-Ho Yoon6

“Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere.

“Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea-ice, the mechanism that links sea-ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate.

“Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea-ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere.

“We find that decreased sea-ice cover during early winter months (November– December), especially over the Barents–Kara seas, enhances the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the strato- spheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January–February).

“The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes.”


 

Link to Full Article in Nature Communication

2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

 

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